THE TRING WAR MEMORIAL
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Most of the town’s young men who fought “for King and Country” had unskilled occupations,
such as the farm labourers pictured above.


SERGEANT. If you were one of them, ma’am, and death or glory was the call, you would take the [King’s] shilling, ma’am.

PHOEBE. Oh, not for that.

SERGEANT. For King and Country, ma’am?

PHOEBE. (grandly). Yes, yes, for that.



FOREWORD


‘Stormtroopers advancing under a gas attack’ − a drawing by Otto Dix in the Cloth Hall, Ypres.
The Germans’ use of mustard gas at Passchendaele caused untold suffering to men and horses.


The Battle of the Somme commenced in July 1916.  Four and a half months later the fighting ended, the Allies having gained little.  Mud, blood and futility − more than 3 million troops (mainly Franco-British and German) took part in the conflict, one million of whom were wounded or killed making the Somme one of the bloodiest battles ever fought.  To mark the battle’s centenary, local historian Wendy Austin published a collection of letters that had been sent to friends and relatives in Tring by servicemen fighting in various theatres of the First World War. (THEY CALLED US TO ARMS)



Twelve months later there followed a further bloody conflict, the Flanders Offensive.  This series of battles (11th July–10th November 1917) aimed to occupy the high ground of the Passchendaele Ridge, thereby securing a good position from which to thrust forward to the the Belgian coast and to the ports of Ostend and Zeebrugge.  Both ports were used by German shipping, but Zeebrugge was also home to the German submarine pens that supported the U-boat campaign then being waged with great success against Allied shipping.  The offensive was also intended to relieve pressure on the French to the south, whose forces were then experiencing mutinies stemming from the huge losses they had suffered at the Battles of Verdun, the Somme and the Aisne (2nd).



Soldiers of an Australian 4th Division field artillery brigade on a duckboard track passing through Chateau Wood, near Hooge in the Ypres salient, 29th October 1917.  The leading soldier is Gunner James Fulton and the second soldier is Lieutenant Anthony Devine.  The men belong to a battery of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.  Australian War Memorial collection number E01220.


The initial British-led attack (the Battle of Messines) was successful, but within hours of the final phase of the offensive commencing it began to rain.  And rain continued with little remission in the weeks that followed making the assault on Passchendaele a name synonymous with the mud, blood, horror and human sacrifice that has come to characterise trench warfare.


“The Somerset and Lincolnshire formed up under the greatest difficulties, and at 6 a.m. attacked the enemy.  But from the time they left their assembly positions both battalions came under murderous machine-gun fire . . . . Owing to the whole plateau being swept by these machine-guns and also by the machine-guns from the south, it was decided that the attack could not get over the ground and, owing to casualties, the original line was occupied.”

Passchendaele (Battle of Broodseinde), 4th Oct. 1917
History of the Lincolnshire Regiment


Repose en Paix - a prisoner of war camp funeral cortege, by Maurice Langaskens,
the Cloth Hall, Ypres.


Allied attacks continued sporadically – against the advice of those on the ground and often in appalling weather – until November when the fighting eventually ended with the capture of the Belgian village of Passchendaele by Canadian forces.  Overall, the offensive achieved little, and the impact on the progress of the war of what has come to be known simply as ‘Passchendaele’ remains controversial, for the scale of its casualties – estimated at 325,000 Allied troops – fail to justify its modest achievements (German casualties are estimated at 260,000).  Four months later came the German Spring Offensive [Note] during which the Allies were driven off this shockingly hard-won ground.  Writing in his War Memoirs, wartime Prime Minister David Lloyd George expressed the view that “Passchendaele was indeed one of the greatest disasters of the war . . . . No soldier of any intelligence now defends this senseless campaign . . . .”  But some military historians argue that following the Somme, the Flanders Offensive further eroded Germany’s ability to wage war, for by then American troops were about to enter the conflict and with increased human resources the Allies could far better afford the cost in human life than their adversary.


Portrait of a young British army officer, the Cloth Hall, Ypres.  Artist unknown.


To mark the centenary of the Flanders Offensive I have attempted to discover and document something about the fate of each serviceman whose name appears in the First World War section of the Tring War Memorial.  It is a task that should have been done years ago, for at this late date there remains little personal information on those who fell.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission records identify their memorials, be they war graves or monuments.  The Parish Magazine and the Bucks Herald occasionally provide a little insight into a soldier’s private life, but one wonders what sentiment caused the Herald’s Editor to print “Archie Halsey has willingly and cheerfully laid down his life at the call of duty” (Archie was just 19) − but then we inhabit a more cynical age.

 

Reginald Rolfe and Doris Plater on their wedding day at Aston Clinton, 28th October 1914.
Reg died from injuries on the 26th September 1916 after his aircraft was shot down.  He was 26.

Charles Harrowell, was killed in action on the
19th April 1915, aged 19.  He has no known grave.

Herbert Hazzard was killed in action on the
1st April 1916, aged 21.

Harry Prentice was killed in action on the 19th July 1916, aged 18.

From the Battalion War Diary, 19th July 1916:with a cheer, the four waves leapt up and assaulted the enemy’s trenches.  Even before 5.40 p.m. the enemy’s machine guns had become busy, and at 6 p.m. they mowed down our advancing waves, so that only a few men actually reached the German parapet.  These did not return.”
From the Chaplain: “I thought it might be a comfort to you to know that I buried him with his comrades in a burial ground, where a cross has been erected over his grave with name on, etc.  His grave will be well cared for.”

Headstone inscriptionGOD BE WITH YOU TILL WE MEET AGAIN.


The few wartime letters that survive sometimes give details of a soldier’s fate, but letters from the regiment to grieving relatives often appear a mere form of words . . . .  “he was a great favourite and was highly respected” . . . . is the sort of cliché that crops up, but then nothing more might be expected when the rapid turnover of personnel gave soldiers little time in which to really know each other.  An obituary in the Bucks Herald read “. . . . there were none of his friends left to send his parents any particulars of how he met his death”, but when such particulars were sent home, one wonders whether they did anything to help parents or spouse cope with their grief – “He was hit by a sniper’s bullet . . . . It was hard lines for him . . . He was buried in a cemetery in as good conditions as can be expected”, or this news of the death of Private Edward Barber V.C.  “. . . . while doing his duty he was picked off by a German sniper, the bullet piercing his brain . . . .”  So often the young man − for most were young − was left where he fell to have, like Barber V.C., ‘no known grave.


New Mill Baptist Church Cemetery, Tring.
In this beautiful secluded cemetery, in an unmarked grave, lies
Private Charles Miller,
2nd Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.
Invalided out of the army after contracting rheumatic fever in the trenches, 5th October 1915.
Died 17th August 1916, aged 25 years.



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


My thanks to Tring local historians Jill Fowler and Mike Bass, who provided me with what photographs survive of the servicemen named on the Tring War Memorial together with copies of Census, military and other documents.


John Bowman (1926-2013)


I acknowledge also the work of the late John Bowman who made copies of the Great War obituaries that appeared in contemporary editions of the Parish Magazine, which I have reproduced, and thank local historian Wendy Austin for the use of her article on the Tring War Memorial and other photographs and documents.

Not being a military historian I have had to drawn extensively on the records of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and the publications of the military historians who have analysed the battles of the Great War and the parts played by the battalions involved − my thanks to them also.

Finally, any reader who can contribute further documented information relating to the servicemen whose names appear on the Great War section of the Tring War Memorial can contact me via the e-mail address at the foot of this page.

Ian Petticrew

May 2017


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CONTENTS

THE TRING WAR MEMORIAL

RECRUITING

NAMES OF THE FALLEN, IN SURNAME ORDER

NAMES OF THE FALLEN, IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER


NOTES:
Anderson to Cross
Cutler to Haystaff

Hayward to Pratt
Prentice to Young


HISTORY OF THE WAR MEMORIAL

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THE TRING WAR MEMORIAL
 


TRING WAR MEMORIAL
Grade II-listed


THREE-STEPPED STONE BASE SURMOUNTED BY PLINTH, SHAFT AND CRUCIFIX.  INSCRIPTION ON PLINTH IS CARVED AND NAMES ARE IN BLACK LEAD LETTERING.  GRAPE AND FOLIATE DESIGN IN RELIEF ON THE SIDE EDGES OF THE SHAFTS.  THREE-STEPPED STONE BASE SURMOUNTED BY PLINTH, SHAFT AND CRUCIFIX.  INSCRIPTION ON PLINTH IS CARVED AND NAMES ARE IN BLACK LEAD LETTERING.  GRAPE AND FOLIATE DESIGN IN RELIEF ON THE SIDE EDGES OF THE SHAFTS.


On November 27th 1918, just sixteen days after the Armistice at the end of the Great War, a significant event for the towns folk of Tring was enacted on Church Square, when the war memorial commemorating those who had fallen was unveiled in a ceremony led by the Dean of Lincoln.

It over a century since the outbreak of that conflict, and from this distance in time it is difficult to appreciate the different attitudes and sentiments that then prevailed.  An account in the Parish Magazine of the time relates that when war was declared, six hundred men from Tring volunteered immediately or shortly afterwards.  Over eighty of these volunteers came from the ranks of the local branch of The Church Lads’ Brigade.  After the Military Service Act came into force, three hundred more men were conscripted, and the total then represented one-fifth of the population of the town.  Of the nine hundred men serving, Tring lost one hundred and seven, a casualty rate more or less typical of the country as a whole.

The town was more forceful than many others in its urgency to remember with gratitude the young men who had given their lives in what was believed and stated to be ‘the war to end all wars’.  (Having since lived through the rest of the twentieth century, this description is now viewed with cynicism and near despair.  In 1918 it would have been beyond imagination that in less than thirty years, more space on the Memorial would be needed for the names of those killed in a second world conflict).

A plan for the erection of a war memorial in Tring was first proposed in March 1917 by the town’s Chairman of the Church Council.  He stated that he had recently read an article by the great surgeon, Stephen Paget, who suggested that the names of the dead in the Great War be presented in well-shaped legible letters on veined or lustrous marble, with sufficient spacing for each name to be shown in full.  Mr. Paget further explained his idea by saying: “Over all these names there might be the figure of Christ on the cross − not shut in churches, but set in the open air.  Such a figure is singularly close to the war, and the Dead.  In all art, there is no solitary figure so effective.”

Tring took these comments to heart and by August of that year the Church Council was in a position to consider the submissions of various architects.  The unanimous selection was a drawing by Philip M. Johnston FSA, FRIBA, who was asked to visit the site and submit a more detailed plan together with an estimate of cost.  The chosen design of an old English cross carrying the figure of Christ, rose to a height of twenty-three feet above a square plinth, which rested on top of a three-tier octagonal base (on which is now inscribed the names of those who fell in the Great War).  Donations were requested, and the required total of £575. 5s. 10d. was soon raised.

It was hoped that the unveiling could take place on St. Peter’s Day, but the contractors were so overwhelmed with work on military gravestones that the event had to be postponed until the autumn.  When building work was complete the memorial was swathed in a Union flag until the unveiling and dedication ceremony.  (As the war was still not over, the cross was erected without the carving of the names).  Referring again to the Parish Magazine we learn that after a week of drenching rain and high winds the unveiling day dawned fine and sunny.  A small platform was erected in front of the new memorial for General Sir William Robertson, who performed the ceremony, together with the Dean of Lincoln, the Vicar of Tring and the architect, Philip Johnston.  Leaders of other religious faiths were also represented.  The square must have been an impressive sight, for the guard of honour and band was supplied by one hundred men of the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps, whose recruits had trained on nearby Berkhamsted Common.  Tring turned out in force, for during the four years of conflict most people in the town had lost a relative or friend.


General Sir William Robertson at the unveiling ceremony, 27th November 1918.


Later, when the names were inscribed on the memorial, the list included seven men who had won decorations − one Victoria Cross; one Distinguished Conduct Medals; three Military Crosses (one being with bar); and three Military Medals.  In 1914 many of the soldiers from Tring had left for France with the Herts Territorial Battalion which took part in several engagements, with the Guards Brigade in the Second Division.  These men fought at the second Battle of Ypres, where the battalion lost all its officers, and all but one hundred and thirty of its men.  Later in that same year, the battalion saw action on the Somme, again losing all its replacement officers as well as five hundred men.  Other Tring men in the Beds & Herts Regiment also saw action on the Somme, the 7th Battalion advancing at 7.30 am on the first day of the battle (1st July 1916).  The Regimental history relates that the objective of capturing the first-line system of German trenches was achieved, but the price paid had been the loss of all its officers.

Tring’s promptness in erecting its war memorial set an example for many other towns and villages in the country.  This was commended in several newspapers including the Evening News in June 1919, and in October of the same year the Cardiff Evening Express printed a picture of the memorial with the headline: “AS IT SHOULD BE”, the caption beneath stating: “The only War Memorial as yet properly completed and with the names inscribed. Our picture shows the beautiful War Memorial at Tring, Hertfordshire.”


Thanksgiving for Peace on Church Square, 24th July 1919.


Three months previously a special day had been declared as a National Thanksgiving for Peace, and at the request of the returning servicemen, a short informal service was held on Church Square to honour those killed in the conflict.  The relief at the end of all the slaughter and deprivations, rightly or wrongly, triggered the Council to suggest that a celebration should follow the service.  This took the form of a gathering in Tring Park with sports events, a fancy dress parade, and tea served to over one thousand five hundred people.  In the evening there was a firework display and a torchlight procession.  However, the arrangements for the special day had not been entirely trouble-free.  Dispute had arisen between the organisers over the tricky question of whether or not to provide free beer.  This caused committee members to split into two factions, one staunch chapel-goer stating: “There is great danger in the suggestion of free beer.”  Another opposed this view and said: “After the experiences of the men, and what they have gone through, it is humbug to think they should not have a glass of beer.”  In spite of this commonsense approach, the proposal to give beer was defeated by fifteen votes to twelve.  Those unable to get to the park on that day were not forgotten, for in the following week, an entertainment with lavish tea was arranged for all those over sixty-five years, including those described as ‘cripples and the afflicted’, and the wives of men who fell in the war.

For many years Tring’s war memorial was half-hidden by the gates in the churchyard wall, which were only opened on Remembrance Sundays.  At that time Church Square was a car park which grew increasingly busy over the years, and the resulting bustle caused the memorial to be over-shadowed.  In the 1990s the decision was taken to refurbish the square, which included removing the gates and opening up the area generally.  The monument now presents a striking aspect, as well as an opportunity for quiet reflection − surely the purpose of those concerned in its original planning and design.


Wendy Austin.


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New Mill Baptist Chapel Roll of Honour.

 
RECRUITING


From the Bucks Herald, 12th September 1914:


Tring is nobly responding to Lord Kitchener’s call, and many young men—realising that their King and country need them—are bravely taking their place in the fighting line.  Resigning their employment, giving up their friends, sacrificing their home ties, their ease, and in many cases their business prospects, they are flocking to the colours, and, taking their lives in their hands, are prepared, wherever needed, either at home or abroad, to serve their King and country.  All honour to them!  Their fellow townsmen are proud of them, and regard them with admiration; and some—whose age prevents them joining the throng at the recruiting office—with not a little envy.

We published last week the names of the Tring men, as far as we were able to ascertain them, who have joined the colours.  This week we are able to add other names to the Tring “Roll of Honour
: —

 

Batson, Ralph, R.F.A.
Brackley, Tom, Lord Kitchener’s Army
Butler, Eric
Birch, William, Lord Kitchener’s Army
Betts, Alfred, Grenadier Guards
Brookman, John, Herts Territorials
Cox, F, Oxford Light Infantry
Cartwright, Joseph, Durham Light Infantry
Collier, Stanley, A.S.C., Royal Navy
Copcutt, John, Oxford and Bucks Infantry
Dossett, J. T., Dispatch Rider Lord Kitchener’s Army
Dunton, Stanley, 9th Middlesex
Eggleton, John, Oxford Light Infantry
Fenemore, John, Lord Kitchener’s Army
Fenn, William, Canadian Contingent, Durham Light Infantry
Flower, Captain Stanley, Egyptian Army
Gates, Walter, Lord Kitchener’s Army
Grace, Oliver Gilbert, Dragoon Guards
Grisewood, Leonard, Lord Kitchener’s Army
Harding, W. I., Lord Kitchener’s Army
Holland, Arthur, Oxford Light Infantry
Henley, Frank, Oxford Light Infantry
Harrop, Joseph William, National Reserve


From the Bucks Herald, 3rd October 1914:


We learn from the Tring Church magazine that the following from the Church Lads’ Brigade are now on active service: Ralph Batson, William Charles Birch, Frank Bates, Cyril Butcher, William Cooper, Joseph Cartwright, Arthur Davey, Stanley Dunton, John Leonard Harding, Samuel Kesley, Frank Metcalf, Arthur Probets, Frank Sheeman, William Spinks, Sidney Tite, Charles Wade, Thomas Welling, Stanley Wilkins, Oliver Wilkins, Arthur Wilkins, Eric Woodman.


From the Bucks Herald, 29th May 1915:


FORESTERS ON ACTIVE SERVICE.− No less than 84 members of Court Albion No4423 Ancient Order of Foresters, Tring Branch, have answered their country's call.  Their names are:−
Albert T D Batchelor, Martin Busby, Arthur Bradding, Albert Baker, Frank Bates, Frederick W Ball, Raymond D Baker, Sidney J Baldwin, Horace Baldwin, Gilbert Bridges, Frederick Birch, Ernest Cheshire, Albert Casemore, William J Croft, Frederick W Cutler, Harry Chappin, James Dewey, Arthur H Dumpleton, Arthur Davey, Stanley Dunton, Edgar Bell, Frederick Dedman, John Fenemore, Albert T Grace, Oliver G Grace, Walter T Gates, Harold Gurney, Leonard Gristwood, Frank Henley, Ernest Hearn, Frederick B Jellis, Robert Kempster, Sidney Keel, Sidney Lovell, Frederick Lovell, William J Parslow, Frederick Parslow, Ernest Payne, Alfred Pheasant, Herbert Hazzard, Arthur Horn, Reginald Pheasant, Walter J Rance, Arthur Rance, William J Stratfull, Ernest Seabrook, Fred Smith, John Smith, Frank Saunders, Frederick W Talbott, John Wells, Arthur Wilkins, Joseph Wilkins, William Crawley, Thomas Badrick, Arthur Dwight, Horace Dwight, Ernest Capel, Lewis Marks, Albert Mills, Thomas Biddle, Jesse Gascoine, George Mills, John Nutkins, William Willing, Ernest Rolfe, Frederick J Burch, Tom Brackley, Joseph M Burch, Frederick A Crockett, William G Eggleton, Joe Howes, Thomas Jakeman, Robert W Millins.


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Akeman Street Baptist Chapel Roll of Honour

 
NAMES INSCRIBED ON THE MEMORIAL
IN SURNAME ORDER

14th Northumberland Fusiliers practicing trench attacking, Halton Camp, 1915.
 

 

DIED

FAMILY NAME

RANK AND UNIT

03/04/1917

Anderson, John Henry

Private, 44th Canadian Infantry

02/12/1917

Asquith, Gordon William

2nd Lieut, 3rd King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

23/10/1918

 Ayres, James Edward

Driver, Royal Army Service Corps

30/05/1918

Badrick, Percy

Rifleman, 2nd Rifle Brigade

21/10/1915

Baker, Will

Private, Royal Marine Light Infantry

23/08/1918

Bandy, Albert M.M.

L/Corporal, 18th Bn. King's Royal Rifle Corps

12/03/1915

Barber, Edward V.C.

Private, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards

20/09/1916

Bates, Frank Manfield

Private, 6th Somerset Light Infantry

15/05/1917

Battson, Ralph Bertram

Driver, 31st Royal Field Artillery

28/04/1915

Birch, William Charles

 Private, 1st Border Regiment

17/10/1915

Brackley, Thomas

Private, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards

24/03/1918

Brackley, Henry

Gunner, 76th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery

04/04/1916

Brandon, William

Private, 27th Bn. Canadian Infantry

12/10/1918

Brooks, George

 Private, 10th Lancashire Fusiliers

02/07/1916

Brown, Andrew Cranstoun

2nd Lieut, 8th South Staffordshire Regiment

27/09/1918

Burch, Frank M.M.

Private, 1st Bedfordshire Regiment

19/11/1916

Cartwright, Thomas

Private, 78th Canadian Infantry

10/03/1918

Cato, Reginald Robert

Gunner, 31st Royal Garrison Artillery

07/11/1918

Clarke, Frederick Edward

Private, East Surrey Regiment

23/11/1918

Clements, James

Gunner, 264th Royal Field Artillery

05/06/1916

Collier, Stanley

Able Seaman, RN

25/12/1916

Collins, Jesse

Private, 99th Training Reserve

02/06/1915

Crawley, Charles Jesse

Private, 2nd Middlesex Regiment

20/09/1917

Crawley, Ultimius George

Private, 6th Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

30/07/1916

Crockett, George

Private, 2nd Bedfordshire Regiment

28/11/1917

Cross, Arthur Albert

Private, Royal Bucks Hussars

07/09/1915

Cross, Herbert William

Private, 1st Bedfordshire Regimen

22/08/1918

Cutler, Ernest

Private, 7th Norfolk Regiment

11/07/1916

Davey, William

Private, 2nd Bedfordshire Regiment

16/03/1917

Davey, Henry Arthur

Private, 6th Bedfordshire Regiment

13/02/1918

Dawe, Sidney Charles M.C.

Captain, 5th Lincolnshire Regiment

23/09/1917

Dell, William Clement

Rifleman, 12th King's Royal Rifle Corps

30/09/1915

Dunton, Stanley

Private, 3rd Battalion Middlesex Regiment

08/10/1917

Eggleton, Stanley Rumball

Staff Sergeant, Australian Army Medical Corps

15/07/1916

Fenemore, John M.M.

Sergeant, 64th Machine Gun Corps

12/10/1918

Fenner, Laurence Henry

Private, 5th Canadian Infantry

28/04/1917

Foskett, Herbert Edward

Second Lieutenant, 5th Bedfordshire Regiment

06/08/1917

Foster, Stanley Francis

Private, 6th Bedfordshire Regiment

28/08/1918

Fountain, Sidney Thomas

Private, 1st Cambridgeshire Regiment

17/07/1917

French, Frederick Arthur

Private, 6th East Yorkshire Regiment

12/07/1916

Gates, Walter Thomas

Private, 7th East Kent Regiment

26/07/1918

Gates, Frank John

Rifleman, 8th Post Office Rifles

02/11/1918

Gates, Herbert James

L/Corporal, 2nd Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

13/11/1916

Gregory, Frederick John

Private, 4th Bedfordshire Regiment

03/05/1917

Gristwood, Leonard William

L/Corporal, 55th Machine Gun Corps

28/02/1918

Gunn, George

Private, 11th Royal Sussex Regiment

21/09/1916

Halsey, Archibald

Private, 1st Hertfordshire Regiment

26/08/1916

Hance, George James

Private, 2nd Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

08/10/1915

Hardy, Leslie George

Corporal, 1st Coldstream Guards

19/04/1915

Harrowell, Charles

Private, 1st Bedfordshire Regiment

22/10/1917

Harrowell, James

Lance Corporal, 9th King's Royal Rifle Corps

28/10/1916

Hartert, Joachim Charles

Lieutenant, 8th East Yorkshire Regiment

05/11/1918

Haystaff, Sydney

Private, 87th Canadian Infantry

04/05/1917

Hayward, Walter

Private, 6th Australian Machine Gun Corps

01/04/1916

Hazzard, Herbert

Private, 1st Oxf and Bucks Light Infantry

16/04/1918

Hedges, Sydney Walter

L/Corporal, 6th Northamptonshire Regiment

16/11/1918

Hedges, John Russell

Private, 1st Bedfordshire Regiment

17/11/1916

Horn, Joseph

Private, 2nd Middlesex Regiment

04/10/1917

Howlett, Charles Frederick

Private, 8th Lincolnshire Regiment

17/02/1917

Janes, Henry

Corporal, Royal Marine Light Infantry

02/10/1917

Kempster, Frederick

Rifleman, 7th Royal Irish Rifles

13/02/1919

King, Ernest

Private, 4th North Staffordshire Regiment

25/02/1916

Lovegrove, Bert

Private, 9th East Surrey Regiment

02/08/1916

Lovell, Frederick

Private, 13th Essex Regiment

16/11/1918

Lovell, Arthur

Private, 54th Machine Gun Corps

29/03/1915

Marcham, Frank Edgar

Private, 1st Hertfordshire Regiment

17/08/1916

Miller, Charles

Private, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry

02/06/1917

Miller, Stanley

Corporal, 1st Royal Bucks Hussars

03/03/1919

Miller, William John

Private, Royal Army Ordnance Corps

28/04/1917

Mills, George

Private, 112th Machine Gun Corps

04/12/1918

Norwood, William Edward

Driver, 163rd Machine Gun Corps

01/08/1916

Oakley, William Edwin

Private, Royal Sussex Regiment

25/10/1917

Oakley, George

Private, 12th Northumberland Fusiliers

26/07/1917

Philbey, Henry Richard

L/Corporal, 2nd Beds Regiment

24/08/1918

Pope, Harold Edward M.C. bar

Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery

20/09/1914

Poulton, Harry

Private, 2nd Battalion, Highland Light Infantry

31/10/1914

Poulton, Joseph

Private, 1st Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment

19/07/1916

Pratt, Sidney Richard

Private, 53rd Australian Infantry

05/07/1918

Pratt, Stanley James

Sergeant, 48th Sqdn., RAF

19/07/1916

Prentice, Harry

Private, 2nd Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

06/01/1916

Rance, Harry

Bugler, 58th Canadian Infantry

09/06/1918

Rance, Arthur Henry

 Corporal, 62nd Machine Gun Corps

29/10/1918

Rance, Walter

L/Corporal , 2nd Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment

12/11/1918

Randall, Sidney James

Private, Canadian Expeditionary Force

28/06/1917

Rew, Douglas Jolland

2nd Lieut, 5th Essex Regiment

23/07/1916

Roberts, Thomas Walter

Private, 7th East Surrey Regiment

11/06/1918

Robinson, Frank

Private, 17th Tank Corps

26/09/1916

Rolfe, Horace Hedley Reginald

Air Mechanic 2nd Class, 1st Wing HQ RFC

25/09/1918

Seabrook, William Charles

Sergeant, 1st Aeroplane Supply Depot Repair Park, RAF

26/09/1916

Spinks, William George D.C.M.

Sergeant, 1st Hertfordshire Regiment

11/01/1918

Spinks, Charles Edward

L/Corporal, 7th Bedfordshire Regiment

02/11/1918

Stevens, Charles Sidney

Private, 15th Suffolk Regiment

17/10/1915

Stratford, Arthur

Private, 5th Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

08/08/1917

Turvey, Frederick

Private, 9th Royal Dublin Fusiliers

25/03/1918

Tyler, Albert John

Private, 10th Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry

07/09/1918

Vaisey, Roland Maddison

Captain, 36th Royal Field Artillery

22/09/1914

Wells, Arthur

Stoker, Royal Navy

19/02/1919

Wells, Arthur Frank

Private, 74th Royal Army Ordnance Corps

12/06/1918

West, Joseph

Private, 7th Royal West Kent Regiment

03/09/1916

Wilkins, Arthur

Rifleman, 10th Rifle Brigade

04/03/1917

Wilkins, Frank George

Private, 1st Worcestershire Regiment

16/08/1917

Wilkins, Oliver

Bugler, 1st Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

03/11/1916

Woods, Sidney

Private, 8th Bedfordshire Regiment

03/06/1917

Wright, Ernest George

Private, 1st Essex Regiment

27/05/1918

Young, George Walter

Captain, 8th East Yorkshire Regiment

24/03/1918

Young, Marcus Ernest

2nd Lieut, Royal Field Artillery

 


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NAMES INSCRIBED ON THE MEMORIAL
IN CHRONOLOGICAL (D.O.D.) ORDER


Musketry, 14th Northumberland Fusiliers, Halton, May 1915.
 

DIED

FAMILY NAME

RANK AND UNIT

20/09/1914

Poulton, Harry

Private, 2nd Battalion, Highland Light Infantry

22/09/1914

Wells, Arthur

Stoker 1st class, Royal Navy

31/10/1914

Poulton, Joseph

Private, 1st Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment

12/03/1915

Barber, Edward V.C.

Private, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards

29/03/1915

Marcham, Frank Edgar

Private, 1st Hertfordshire Regiment

19/04/1915

Harrowell, Charles

Private, 1st Bedfordshire Regiment

28/04/1915

Birch, William Charles

 Private, 1st Border Regiment

02/06/1915

Crawley, Charles Jesse

Private, 2nd Middlesex Regiment

   07/09/1915

Cross, Herbert William

Private, 1st Bedfordshire Regimen

04/04/1916

Brandon, William

Private, 27th Bn. Canadian Infantry

30/09/1915

Dunton, Stanley

Private, 3rd Battalion Middlesex Regiment

08/10/1915

Hardy, Leslie George

Corporal, 1st Coldstream Guards

17/10/1915

Brackley, Thomas

Private, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards

17/10/1915

Stratford, Arthur

Private, 5th Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

21/10/1915

Baker, Will

Private, Royal Marine Light Infantry

06/01/1916

Rance, Harry

Bugler, 58th Canadian Infantry

25/02/1916

Lovegrove, Bert

Private, 9th East Surrey Regiment

01/04/1916

Hazzard, Herbert

Private, 1st Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

05/06/1916

Collier, Stanley

Able Seaman, RN

02/07/1916

Brown, Andrew Cranstoun

2nd Lieut, 8th South Staffordshire Regiment

11/07/1916

Davey, William

Private, 2nd Bedfordshire Regiment

12/07/1916

Gates, Walter Thomas

Private, 7th East Kent Regiment

15/07/1916

Fenemore, John M.M.

Sergeant, 64th Machine Gun Corps

19/07/1916

Pratt, Sidney Richard

Private, 53rd Australian Infantry

19/07/1916

Prentice, Harry

Private, 2nd Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

23/07/1916

Roberts, Thomas Walter

Private, 7th East Surrey Regiment

30/07/1916

Crockett, George

Private, 2nd Bedfordshire Regiment

01/08/1916

Oakley, William Edwin

Private, Royal Sussex Regiment

02/08/1916

Lovell, Frederick

Private, 13th Essex Regiment

17/08/1916

Miller, Charles

Private, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry

26/08/1916

Hance, George James

Private, 2nd Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

03/09/1916

Wilkins, Arthur

Rifleman, 10th Rifle Brigade

20/09/1916

Bates, Frank Manfield

Private, 6th Somerset Light Infantry

21/09/1916

Halsey, Archibald

Private, 1st Hertfordshire Regiment

26/09/1916

Rolfe, Horace Hedley Reginald

Air Mechanic 2nd Class, 1st Wing HQ RFC

26/09/1916

Spinks, William George D.C.M.

Sergeant, 1st Hertfordshire Regiment

28/10/1916

Hartert, Joachim Charles

Lieutenant, 8th East Yorkshire Regiment

03/11/1916

Woods, Sidney

Private, 8th Bedfordshire Regiment

13/11/1916

Gregory, Frederick John

Private, 4th Bedfordshire Regiment

17/11/1916

Horn, Joseph

Private, 2nd Middlesex Regiment

19/11/1916

Cartwright, Thomas

Private, 78th Canadian Infantry

25/12/1916

Collins, Jesse

Private, 99th Training Reserve

17/02/1917

Janes, Henry

Corporal, Royal Marine Light Infantry

04/03/1917

Wilkins, Frank George

Private, 1st Worcestershire Regiment

16/03/1917

Davey, Henry Arthur

Private, 6th Bedfordshire Regiment

03/04/1917

Anderson, John Henry

Private, 44th Canadian Infantry

28/04/1917

Foskett, Herbert Edward

Second Lieutenant, 5th Bedfordshire Regiment

28/04/1917

Mills, George

Private, 112th Machine Gun Corps

03/05/1917

Gristwood, Leonard William

L/Corporal, 55th Machine Gun Corps

04/05/1917

Hayward, Walter

Private, 6th Australian Machine Gun Corps

15/05/1917

Battson, Ralph Bertram

Driver, 31st Royal Field Artillery

02/06/1917

Miller, Stanley

Corporal, 1st Royal Bucks Hussars

03/06/1917

Wright, Ernest George

Private, 1st Essex Regiment

28/06/1917

Rew, Douglas Jolland

2nd Lieut, 5th Essex Regiment

17/07/1917

French, Frederick Arthur

Private, 6th East Yorkshire Regiment

26/07/1917

 Philbey, Henry Richard

L/Corporal, 2nd Beds Regiment

06/08/1917

Foster, Stanley Francis

Private, 6th Bedfordshire Regiment

08/08/1917

Turvey, Frederick

Private, 9th Royal Dublin Fusiliers

16/08/1917

Wilkins, Oliver

Bugler, 1st Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

20/09/1917

Crawley, Ultimius George

Private, 6th Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

23/09/1917

Dell, William Clement

Rifleman, 12th King's Royal Rifle Corps

02/10/1917

Kempster, Frederick

Rifleman, 7th Royal Irish Rifles

04/10/1917

Howlett, Charles Frederick

Private, 8th Lincolnshire Regiment

08/10/1917

Eggleton, Stanley Rumball

Staff Sergeant, Australian Army Medical Corps

22/10/1917

Harrowell, James

Lance Corporal, 9th King's Royal Rifle Corps

25/10/1917

Oakley, George

Private, 12th Northumberland Fusiliers

28/11/1917

Cross, Arthur Albert

Private, Royal Bucks Hussars

02/12/1917

Asquith, Gordon William

2nd Lieut, 3rd King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

11/01/1918

Spinks, Charles Edward

L/Corporal, 7th Bedfordshire Regiment

13/02/1918

Dawe, Sidney Charles M.C.

Captain, 5th Lincolnshire Regiment

28/02/1918

Gunn, George

Private, 11th Royal Sussex Regiment

10/03/1918

Cato, Reginald Robert

Gunner, 31st Royal Garrison Artillery

24/03/1918

Brackley, Henry

Gunner, 76th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery

24/03/1918

Young, Marcus Ernest

2nd Lieut, Royal Field Artillery

25/03/1918

Tyler, Albert John

Private, 10th Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry

16/04/1918

Hedges, Sydney Walter

L/Corporal, 6th Northamptonshire Regiment

27/05/1918

Young, George Walter

Captain, 8th East Yorkshire Regiment

30/05/1918

Badrick, Percy

Rifleman, 2nd Rifle Brigade

09/06/1918

Rance, Arthur Henry

 Corporal, 62nd Machine Gun Corps

11/06/1918

Robinson, Frank

Private, 17th Tank Corps

12/06/1918

West, Joseph

Private, 7th Royal West Kent Regiment

05/07/1918

Pratt, Stanley James

Sergeant, 48th Sqdn., RAF

26/07/1918

Gates, Frank John

Rifleman, 8th Post Office Rifles

22/08/1918

Cutler, Ernest

Private, 7th Norfolk Regiment

23/08/1918

Bandy, Albert M.M.

L/Corporal, 18th Bn. King's Royal Rifle Corps

24/08/1918

Pope, Harold Edward M.C. bar

Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery

28/08/1918

Fountain, Sidney Thomas

Private, 1st Cambridgeshire Regiment

07/09/1918

Vaisey, Roland Maddison

Captain, 36th Royal Field Artillery

25/09/1918

Seabrook, William Charles

Sergeant, 1st Aeroplane Supply Depot Repair Park, RAF

27/09/1918

Burch, Frank M.M.

Private, 1st Bedfordshire Regiment

12/10/1918

Brooks, George

 Private, 10th Lancashire Fusiliers

12/10/1918

Fenner, Laurence Henry

Private, 5th Canadian Infantry

23/10/1918

 Ayres, James Edward

Driver, Royal Army Service Corps

29/10/1918

Rance, Walter

L/Corporal , 2nd Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment

02/11/1918

Gates, Herbert James

L/Corporal, 2nd Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

02/11/1918

Stevens, Charles Sidney

Private, 15th Suffolk Regiment

05/11/1918

Haystaff, Sydney

Private, 87th Canadian Infantry

07/11/1918

Clarke, Frederick Edward

Private, East Surrey Regiment

12/11/1918

Randall, Sidney James

Private, Canadian Expeditionary Force

16/11/1918

Hedges, John Russell

Private, 1st Bedfordshire Regiment

16/11/1918

Lovell, Arthur

Private, 54th Machine Gun Corps

23/11/1918

Clements, James

Gunner, 264th Royal Field Artillery

04/12/1918

Norwood, William Edward

Driver, 163rd Machine Gun Corps

13/02/1919

King, Ernest

Private, 4th North Staffordshire Regiment

19/02/1919

Wells, Arthur Frank

Private, 74th Royal Army Ordnance Corps

03/03/1919

Miller, William John

Private, Royal Army Ordnance Corps


Despair

――――♦――――

 
PARISH MAGAZINE
DECEMBER 1917

Our War Memorial


WE are at last in a position to speak more definitely about the Memorial which we have decided to erect here to the glory of god and as a thank offering for this goodness to us and our allies in the struggle for truth, righteousness and liberty, and in grateful remembrance of the men from this Parish who have given their lives for the Cause.

It was at the beginning of the year that the proposal for such a Memorial was first brought before our Church Council, and afterwards explained in the pages of the Parish Magazine, and since then, a great deal of thought has been given to the subject, and the utmost care taken to secure, that what is erected should be worthy of the great occasion, in keeping with its surroundings, and best calculated to bring home to our own, and to future generations the true significance of the Great War.  Among several designs submitted to the Council, one of a Cross on thoroughly old English lines — strongly commended to them, and the services of the architect, Mr. P. M. Johnson, F.R.I.B.A. were enlisted.  The print which we are here able to produce will show our readers what the design is, and the character of the Memorial to which they are asked to subscribe.  We were advised that, before such a Memorial could be erected, it was necessary to obtain a Faculty from the Chancellor of the Diocese and a meeting of the Vestry had to be summoned to support the petition of the Vicar and Churchwardens for the Faculty. The Vestry was duly held on Thursday November 8th 1917, and, after Mr. Johnston’s design had been seen by those present, it was unanimously resolved to support the scheme.

The petition with a tracing of the proposed Memorial, was sent to the Diocesan Authorities, and met with their approval.  We are now in a position to proceed to carry out the scheme without further delay.  The cost of the Cross is to be £380, but in order to meet the architect’s fees and other accidental expenses, the Council feel that they must appeal for a sum of not less than £450.

Towards this we have received the following amounts (a list of names is printed with total shown for each name) the total together being £321—3s.—0d.  Considering that no formal appeal has yet been made to our readers, this must be regarded as a very encouraging start.  But we hope that very soon we shall be assured that the remainder of the money is forthcoming, and that we shall receive not only substantial sums from those who can afford to give them, but a number of small donations from persons who would wish to have a share in raising this Memorial and cannot give much.

Subscriptions can be sent either direct to the Vicar, who is acting treasurer of the fund, or can be paid at the Bank, where an account has been opened for this purpose.

The names of the men from these places who have made the great surrender are to be engraved on the steps of the Cross, but no man’s name will be placed there without the consent of his friends.  We cannot imagine any more fitting permanent memorial of the great events of these last great years than the one which we have been thus led to wish to erect.  “A Cross like this is the only possible Memorial” as one of our men from the front wrote.

Nothing has marked these years more than the wonderful and almost worldwide spirit of pure self sacrifice.

What more natural, then, than the minds of Christians should turn with appreciation towards that figure which represents the supreme act of self sacrifice and that they should long to associate the death of their brave men and boys with the death of Christ.  Like Christ Himself they have given their lives for others, and so far, at all events, have followed the way of the Cross, and walked in His footsteps.  Surely it is not surprising that they should desire that the names of their Heroes should be recorded under such a figure.  And in such a desire there is not trace of superstition, but only a very faithful Christianity which reaches out beyond these men who died for us, to Him who died for them and for all.

It would be awful indeed if the lessons of this war were ever forgotten, and all this blood and treasure should have been poured out in vain as far as those who come after us are concerned.  Such a Memorial will, we hope, help to remind all who look at it, what it was, for which so many thousands were ready to give their best.

They Died like Jesus Christ to give us Liberty, they were the victims, as, He was, of a wicked system, and as we look on His sufferings and remember theirs, we shall, please God, resolve more whole heartedly, to love what has been won for us at such a tremendous price, and to hate what was destroyed at such awful cost.


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PARISH MAGAZINE
JANUARY 1918

Our War Memorial


We are glad to find how much the design for our War Memorial is appreciated by those who have seen the picture which the Architect drew for our last issue .

Many have told us how glad they are to know that such a Memorial is to be erected here, to commemorate, as we should like our readers clearly to remember, not only those from this place who have given their lives in the Services of their Country, but also as a remembrance of the great event of the War and Gods mercy to us throughout.  All, therefore, whether they have lost friends at this time, or not, may very well feel a desire to have a share in giving to it.

The following further sums have been received:

(A further list of names and donations) £18-16s.-6d.  We should be glad if those who are intending to contribute would send us their donations (or promises of donations) as soon as possible, that we may be assured of the sum required without any undue delay.  The above list was closed—for printing purposes — on 21st December.  Sums received since that date will be acknowledged next month.

 

Total sum required as estimated £450-0s.-0d.
Amount previously acknowledged £359-2s.-0d.

We should like to assure our readers, once more, how much we value the small sums, and how unnecessary it is for any to apologise for only being able to contribute these. Our hope is that the Memorial will be the gift of Parishioners and Friends generally: not only of those who, alas, have names to be inscribed on the steps, but of all who value the sacrifices which have been made, and wish to record their thankfulness to God for what these sacrifices have meant.

We should also like to say that, as the order for the Memorial has been given, and it is hoped that it will be ready for unveiling by the end of June, it will be a great help to receive the rest of the money required as soon as possible.

General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien has very kindly promised to come and unveil the Memorial when it is ready.

Amounts since received.

(Names and amounts as before)

Total for month £17-12s.-0d.


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PARISH MAGAZINE
FEBRUARY 1918

Our War Memorial


The number of subscriptions that are regularly coming in for “Our Memorial”, as it is now called, is most satisfactory, and evidently show how many are anxious to have a share in it.  Although a few larger sums, from those who can afford to give them, would be acceptable and make our task easier, we should be glad to feel that all our readers had helped, and given what they could.

The Architect leads us to hope that the Cross will be ready by the end of June, and we have provisionally fixed St Peter’s Day (Saturday 29th June) for the unveiling.  We hope, therefore, that before that date, the whole amount required will have been subscribed.

Total sum required as estimated £450-0s.-0d.
Amount previously acknowledged £339-19s.-6d

Amounts since received:—

(Names and amounts listed as before)

Total £19-2s.-6d.
 


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PARISH MAGAZINE
MARCH 1918

Our War Memorial


Total sum required as estimated £450-0s.-0d.
Amount previously acknowledged £359-2s.-0d.

We should like to assure our readers, once more, how much we value the small sums, and how unnecessary it is for any to apologise for only being able to contribute these.  Our hope is that the Memorial will be the gift of Parishioners and Friends generally: not only of those who, alas, have names to be inscribed on the steps, but of all who value the sacrifices which have been made, and wish to record their thankfulness to God for what these sacrifices have meant.

We should also like to say that, as the order for the Memorial has been given, and it is hoped that it will be ready for unveiling by the end of June, it will be a great help to receive the rest of the money required as soon as possible.

General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien has very kindly promised to come and unveil the Memorial when it is ready.

Amounts since received:—

(Names and amounts as before)

Total for month £17-12s.-0d.


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PARISH MAGAZINE
APRIL 1918

Our War Memorial


Total sum estimated £450-0.0
Amount previously acknowledged £376-14.0

The Venerable, the Archdeacon of St. Albans has kindly promised to come and dedicate the Memorial after General Smith-Dorrien has unveiled it on St. Peter’s Day, 29th June.

Amount for month listed as before £12-10.6


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PARISH MAGAZINE
MAY 1918

Our War Memorial


The small sub committee appointed by the Church Council, to determine the form of the inscription to be placed at the foot of the Cross, have, with the help of those whose advice they sought, decided to write the following words:—


REMEMBER WITH THANKSGIVING
THE TRUE AND FAITHFUL MEN
WHO FOR THE LOVE OF GOD AND RIGHT
WENT FORTH FROM THIS PLACE
AGAINST THE ENEMIES OF OUR COUNTRY.


THE NAMES OF THOSE WHO RETURNED NOT AGAIN
ARE HERE INSCRIBED TO BE HONOURED
FOR EVERMORE.


And on the four sides of the uppermost step will be added this verse from the fourth Chapter of the Book Baruch:—


“FOR I SENT YOU OUT WITH MOURNING AND WEEPING BUT GOD WILL GIVE
YOU TO ME AGAIN WITH JOY AND GLADNESS FOR EVER”.


We were not surprised, though of course disappointed, to hear from our Architect that the contractors, owing to the fresh inroads which the New Military Service Act is making on their working staff, find that it will be impossible for them to finish the carving of the memorial, in time for it to be unveiled on St. Peter’s Day.  The ceremony is therefore postponed until the early Autumn, when please God, our position on the Western Front will be a less anxious one than it now is, and we shall better be able to appreciate the significance of the Memorial.

We hope took that before then, all the money required will have been subscribed.

Total sum required, as estimated £450-0s.-0d.
Amount previously acknowledge £389-4s.-6d.

Total for month £10-0s.-6d.


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PARISH MAGAZINE
JUNE 1918

Our War Memorial


In our May number we published the form of inscription which it is proposed to place at the fort of the Cross.

Upon this, several comments and suggestions have been received, all of which have been carefully considered.  It is, of course, impossible to please all tastes in such a matter and the words which have been finally approved by the sub committee are as follows:—


1914 - 1918
REMEMBER WITH THANKS GIVING
THE TRUE AND FAITHFUL MEN
WHO IN THESE YEARS OF WAR
WENT FORTH FROM THIS PLACE
FOR GOD AND THE RIGHT.
___________

THE NAMES OF THOSE WHO RETURNED NOT AGAIN ARE HERE INSCRIBED
TO BE HONOURED FOR EVERMORE
R.I.P.


and on the four sides of the uppermost step these words will appear:—


FOR I SENT YOU OUT
WITH MOURNING AND WEEPING
BUT GOD WILL GIVE YOU TO ME AGAIN
WITH JOY AND GLADNESS FOREVER


Total sum required, as estimated £450-0s.-0d.
Amount previously acknowledged £399-5s.-0d.
Amount for June £6-6s.-0d


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PARISH MAGAZINE
JULY 1918

Our War Memorial


Total sum required, as estimated £450-0s.-0d.
Amount previously acknowledged £405-11s.-0d.
July subscriptions £8-1s.-0d.

The Architect quite hopes that the Cross will be ready by September.  Will those, therefore, who have not yet subscribed, and wish to do so, kindly send their offerings as soon as possible to the Vicar.  It will be delightful to know that the whole amount required has been given before the Memorial is dedicated.

Our War Memorial August 1918

Total sum required, as estimated £450-0s.-0d.
Amount previously acknowledged £413-12s.-0d.
August total £5-19s.-6d.

Our War Memorial September 1918

Total sum required, as estimated £450-0s.-0d.
Amount previously acknowledged £419-11s.-6d.
September total £16-6s.-6d.

Our War Memorial October 1918

Total sum required, as estimated £450-0s.-0d.
Amount previously acknowledged £435-18s.-0d.
October total £25-11s.-0d.

We have thus received more than the sum we originally asked for; and we are most thankful that what has been given, has been given without any further appeal than that made in the pages of our Magazine.

Those who have given, and those who still intend to give, need have no anxiety that their gifts will not be needed.  The cost of the wrought iron gates which will guard the opening in the Churchyard wall, is considerably in excess of that which was estimated.  There are certain to be other incidental expenses also which we cannot now foresee.

The carving of the names of those who have laid down their lives, which alas weekly grow in number, will have to be done after the cross is put up, and we cannot yet tell what the cost of this carving will be.  Let no one, therefore hesitate to send to the fund.  Other gifts will still be gratefully acknowledged.


______________________


PARISH MAGAZINE
NOVEMBER 1918

Our War Memorial


Amount previously acknowledged £461-9s.-0d.
Amount since received for October £6-7s.-0d.

At last the workman are really here, and are already preparing the foundations for the Cross, so we shall hope, before very long, to announce definitely when the Memorial will be ready for its dedication.  Will those still wishing to contribute to the cost, please do so as soon as possible.


______________________


PARISH MAGAZINE
DECEMBER 1918

Our War Memorial


Amount previously acknowledged £468-16s.-0d.
Amount since received for October £9-6s.10d.

By the time these pages are in circulation, our Memorial will, we hope, have been happily unveiled and dedicated.  All that remains to be done now is the carving of the Names, on the steps of the Cross, of those, from Tring, who have given their lives for our Great Cause.  The list (still alas we fear uncompleted) will be made in alphabetical order.  For that reason, and the difficulty of the carver working in the open during the winter, this work must be left over till the spring.


______________________


PARISH MAGAZINE
JANUARY 1919

Our War Memorial


We were wonderfully favoured in the weather for the unveiling and dedication of our War Memorial, on 27th November last.  In a week of high winds and drenching rain, Wednesday stood out as a day made for the occasion.  The number of those present to take part in the ceremony was very large.

By kind permission of the Colonel the Inns of Court O.T.C. furnished the Guard of Honour, of one hundred men, with their officers, and sent over their splendid Band, which added much to the dignity and beauty of the service.

We are most fortunate too, and highly honoured, in having with us so great a soldier, and so find a personality, as General Sir William Robertson G.C.B (General Officer Commanding in Chief, Great Britain), to perform the unveiling.

The Dean of Lincoln, who, in the unavoidable absence of our Bishop and Archdeacon, most kindly undertook to dedicate the Cross, came specially from Lincoln, and also laid us under a great debt of gratitude.  The small platform was occupied by General Robertson, the Dean of Lincoln, The Rev Henry Francis (Vicar), and Mr. Philip M. Johnson F.S.A. the Architect.

After the General had inspected the Guard of Honour, he, with kind consideration for the school children who were present with their teachers, and the people generally, ordered the soldiers back, so that as many as possible might see and hear.

The Churchwardens, Sidesmen, as well as members of our Church Council, occupied a position close by the Cross, and the Urban Council, headed by their Chairman, were present immediately behind the platform.

Several of our Silver Badge men, too, were represented on the ground, and were recognised by the General.

Many of the immediate relatives of those who have laid down their lives stood inside the enclosure.  The Local Volunteer Force and the Fire Brigade were unable to accept the invitation that had been extended to them, but the Special Constables were strongly represented, and made themselves very useful.

Our Choir, led by the Cross, proceeded to the West side of the Churchyard, and, accompanied by the Band, led the singing.

(The Hymns used being,
“For All the Saints”
“When I survey”, and
“Palms of Glory”).


Before unveiling the Memorial, General Robertson said he regarded it as a great privilege to be asked to unveil the Cross.

It was pleasing, he said, to know, that all creeds and classes had subscribed towards it.  Nearly Nine Hundred Men, or more than 20 per cent, of the total population of this Town, had joined the Army, and of these 600 had volunteered before the Military Service Acts came into force.  One of the men had won the highest distinction given, that of the Victoria Cross, six had won the Distinguished Conduct Medal, four the Military Cross, and ten the Military Medal.

Ninety five had gained the greatest distinction of all, in that they had given their lives.

Many went out with the Hertfordshire Territorial Battalion in November 1914, and took part in many engagements with the Guards Brigade in the Second Division.  They were in the Second Battle of Ypres in 1915, and the battalion lost all its officers and Men, except for 130.  Again, this year, on the Somme, they lost all of their Officers and 500 Men.  Those Men will live in History.

It was a Happy coincidence that the unveiling of the Memorial should take place when the arrival of Peace was so near.

Our Victory was mainly attributable to the justice of our cause, Divine Providence, the Bravery of our Seamen, Soldiers, and Airmen, and the determination and fortitude of the Men and Women at Home.  That, he believed, was an accurate summary of the reasons why we had won.  It was not for him to speak in detail of the invaluable services rendered by our Seamen, and Airmen, he would merely say, that but for the devotion and Heroism of the Men of these Services, Victory of a Military kind would have been quite impossible.

He acknowledged the great part played in the War, by our Allies, but, when all was said and done, it remained true that History contained no finer record of Faithful Devotion to Duty that set by the British Soldier in all parts of the World. History contained no more wonderful record than had been set up by the British Soldier in France, in Italy, in Egypt, in Gallipoli, in Mesopotamia, in Syria, and other parts of the world.  The Old Regular Army, was, perhaps the Finest Ever Seen.  They went into Battle against greatly superior numbers, and many died where they stood.  They left behind a great inspiration to the millions of their Countrymen subsequently raised by that great patriot Lord Kitchener.

Our New Armies had to learn their lesson in the costly and stern school of experience, but, by quickly recognising the value of discipline, and by the most marvellous display of heroism, aptitude, and powers of endurance, they were able to strike the enemy again and again, until he reeled backwards, and defeated, and only saved from complete ruin by his eager acceptance of the Armistice.

It was quite evident that troops who could withstand the onslaughts of the Enemy in the early times, could not be beaten.

They were assembled that afternoon to dedicate that memorial to some of those great men, and it was quite right it should be so.

Without appearing presumptuous, he would suggest that the memorial which would do the greatest honour to their dead would be the dedication of themselves to the completion of the work which they had begun.

We had lost 650,000 of our men and we were too prone to forget that if Germany had been victorious, the British Empire would have ceased to exist, and we should have been subjected to every possible indignity.

If our Men gave Everything, we could do no better than to follow their example, and do our best in the difficult times to come.

In order to cope with the widespread dislocation caused by the War we must submit to National discipline and overrule our inclinations for the common weal.  All had read of the men who, dying in battle, called on their comrades to carry on.  We should show the same spirit.

Seeing how sound, staunch, and steadfast we had proved in these years of War, he was prepared to believe that we were willing to, “carry on” and show we were worthy of the men who had fought and died for their Country.

The General then unveiled the Memorial with the words ”In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, and in the Glorious Memory of the men and boys of Tring who have Died for their Country I unveil this Cross”.  The Dean of Lincoln before dedicating the Memorial said it was indeed an honour to have one of our greatest soldiers to perform that ceremony, and he thanked him most warmly for coming.
The Dean added that he was present because amongst those commemorated were the Sons of some of his dearest and most beloved friends. His sorrow mingled with their sorrow and his pride with their pride.

After the dedication, other prayers were offered by the Vicar, and the Hymn “Palms of Glory” was sung.   The National Anthem followed, and in conclusion buglers sounded the Last Post and the Bells of the Church broke into a muffled peal.  So ended a day which many will long remember with thankfulness.

The War Memorial Fund now stands at £480.-14s.-4d.


______________________


PARISH MAGAZINE
JULY 1919

Our War Memorial


Parishioners may like to know how the account in connection with the Memorial now stands.  All the amounts stated from time to time in the magazine have been paid into the bank, the total now being £485.-1s.-1d.  Of this amount we have paid £357-12s.-10d. to Messrs Norman and Burt (Burgess Hill) for the work already done to the Memorial; £67.-0s.-0d. to Messrs Starky Gardner (Brixton) for the iron gates guarding the Memorial; £20.-0s.-0d. on account to the Architect Mr. Philip M. Johnston and some small sums, including the cost of the faculty, amounting to £3-17s.-10d.  This leaves a balance in the Bank of £36.-10s.-5d.

We have still to meet the cost of carving the names, the stone pathway around the Memorial and the remainder of the fee owing to the Architect.  We want also, a Vellum Roll to be kept in the Church with the names and ranks and regiments of the men inscribed on it.  It would seem, therefore, that we would want a further sum of £100.-0s.-0d. to meet our liabilities.  It would be a great comfort to the Vicar, before he leaves, and to the Church Council, to know that the money had all be subscribed.  Will those who have not yet given, and those who feel they could give more, let us hear from them as soon as possible.

The following paragraph which appeared lately in the Evening News will be of interest to our readers.


A Beautiful inscription.


Mr Walter Long’s letter in the Times on war graves reminds me of a singularly beautiful inscription which I saw the other day on the local War Memorial — a stone crucifix of ancient pattern — in the Churchyard fronting the High Street at Tring, in Hertfordshire.  The inscription, which might well serve as a model to others, runs as follows:—


1914 — 1918

Remember with Thanksgiving the true and faithful men who in these years of
war went forth from this place for God and the Right.

The names of those who returned not again are here inscribed to be honoured
for evermore.

R.I.P.


______________________


PARISH MAGAZINE
AUGUST 1919

The Signing of the Peace Treaty


There were large congregations, both morning and evening, at the Parish Church and St. Martha’s on Sunday, 6th July the day appointed for National Thanksgiving for Peace.  Once more too, we were favoured with fine weather for our united outdoor service, in the square at the south side of the Church.  There was a good attendance of Townspeople, and the singing of the three well-known hymns, led by the Choir of the Parish Church, was hearty and effective.

The sudden change of date for the National Rejoicings left the various committees, which had, fortunately, already been elected to deal with the matter in Tring, a great deal of work to do in a very short time.  However, under the tactful chairmanship of Mr. F. J. Brown, and with the help of our energetic and capable secretary.  Mr. A. E. Hargleden, the seven committees and a large body of splendid workers had everything ready for 19th July and, in spite of unfavourable weather during the latter part of the day, a wonderful programme of events, which gave a great amount of pleasure, was carried out, in a manner which reflected great credit on the organisers.

The Returned Soldiers Committee wisely called together those who were to be their guests, and consulted them beforehand as to their wishes, and many difficulties were in this way, overcome.  One thing the Soldiers all had very much at heart, was that the day should begin with a short informal service in front of our War Memorial, in honour of those from this Town who had lost their lives in the Service of our Country.  The Vicar, at once, arranged for such a service to be held, as they suggested, at 11 o’clock, and, as a London Daily Paper expressed it, this was one of the most impressive incidents of the Tring Peace Celebrations.  Some who were busy in the Park at the time, have expressed a wish that the short address which Mr. Francis gave at the beginning of the service should be published here.

He said: —

“It was very delightful, but only what we might have expected from Comrades of The Great War, that you, unanimously, expressed a wish that, today, your first act, as a body of men, who, by the mercy of God Almighty have been brought back here in safety, should be to gather in front of this Cross, and salute the gallant Dead, who names (to the number of 105) we have all but finished carving its steps.  We ourselves in Tring have met here for a similar purpose, when, on 27th November, this Memorial was unveiled and dedicated to God’s Glory and their Loved Memory.

It was an occasion that many of us will not soon forget.  But today, though there is not the Pomp and Circumstance that befitted that occasion, there is, in the very simple and informal character of our gathering, more than sufficient to compensate for what is lacking in outward show, for there is the heartfelt affectionate tribute of Men to their Mates.  The Men to whose memories you would do honour today are, in every sense of the work your brothers in Arms.  Many of them you have known all your lives; they were, some of them, your best friends, you went to school with them, played with them and finally fought with them for the most glorious cause for which men were ever called to fight.  And “Those all Died in Faith, not having received the promises, but having seen them afar off”.  They never doubted, as has been said, but that this Day of Triumph would Dawn.

Gladly, light heartedly, often ill taught and equipped they died confident that the day of Victory would come.  They made this, our Thanksgiving Day possible, and we rejoice in their Confidence and Faith.  The Greatness of this Day is the measure of their Greatness.  The Glory of the Empire is their Glory they were worthy of our Country.  Therefore they would not have us weep for them today; let there be no note of sadness in your Thanks-giving, they would say; the fittest place where Man can die — they remind us — is where they died — for Men.

And they Died like Him whose arms, as that figure reminds us, will be, for ever stretched over them, and with their life blood bought us our safety, and the World’s Freedom.

As we stand here then, on this Day of National Rejoicing, let us resolve that their Heroic Devotion shall not be lost, let us see to it that they have not Died in Vain.

Let us now turn the Victory of War into the Victory of Peace. And, thank God, we do not salute them here as Dead; is it not we that remain, who in comparison with them, are the dead?  For they are alive for evermore.

Therefore, with heads uplifted and hearts full of gratitude, we hail the Memory of these gallant Men of Imperishable fame, our Brothers in Arms, our Nearest and our Best, and Pray that we may hand on untarnished to those who come after us the Priceless Heritage for which they gave their Lives.

After the short service Mr. C. Pearce, as Chairman of the Tring Urban District Council, cordially welcomed the men home, and, in Tring’s name thanked them all for all they had done and borne for our course.

He expressed the hope that they would give their help in facing the difficult problems that Peace brought with it, with the same courage and determination as they had faced the problems of War, and one and all work together to make life here happy and healthy.  Captain Macdonald Brown returned thanks on behalf of the men.


The WAR MEMORIAL


During September the total amount subscribed has reached £575-5s.-10d.

The Payments are as follows:—


Messrs A.H. Day & Son for Faculty £3.-3s.-0d.
Messrs Emery and Walker Wood Block Engraving of the Design 10s.-9d.
Iron gates and carriage of same £67.-3s.-1d.
Messrs Norman and Burt Builders and Engravers £437.-6s.-11d.
Messrs A H Dawe, Work on gates etc £5.-2s.-6d.
Cheque book and sundries 3s.-0d.
Mr Philip M Johnson (Architect) £61.-16s.-0d.

TOTAL £575.-5s.-10d.


In addition to this, Miss H. C. Williams is kindly giving the Book, beautifully bound and engraved, that will contain a complete list including their rank and Force in which they served of all those from this Parish who lost their lives in the service of their country.  This Book will be kept close to the Altar in our Parish Church.

We have been shown a copy of the Cardiff Evening Express, in which appears a large picture of our Memorial, with the words printed above it.


“AS IT SHOULD BE”


and underneath the following:


“The only War Memorial properly completed with the Names inscribed. Our Picture shows a beautiful War Memorial erected at Tring, in Hertfordshire.”


――――♦――――

 



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