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LONDON:
E. CLAY, SONS, AND TAYLOR,
BREAD STREET HILL.

 


DEDICATION
TO ARCHIBALD CAMERON CORBETT.
―――♦―――

I.


THIS, with the memory of that sweet day,
    When all the placid dreamings of each hill
    Were deep within us, and the thoughts that fill
And widen out our being, as the grey
Morning unfolds itself before the light.
    For at our feet, and all between us two,
    Lay the pure grave of Wordsworth in our view,
All green and dewy with the tears of night.
    We felt as if the spirit of the place
    Were with us.   We were one with all sweet things—
Stream, hill, and lake, had each their tender claim
    To proffer, and their voices, like the strings
Of some great harp, were sounding forth one name;
    While nature knelt and look'd up in our face.


II.


Our old life fled, and, like a thing forgot,
    Lay with the yesterdays that make the past,
    While over all, like purer light, was cast
The placid consecration of the spot.
And as a mother leads with winning speech
    The footsteps of her child, so he who still
    Remains the poet priest of stream and hill,
Led us away into the higher reach
    Where spirit touches spirit, till we saw
A newer meaning on the very grass,
    Whose freshness was the colour of his art,
    A glory in mute things, a sacred awe
Of some high end in all that is and was,
    And still he kept his hand upon our heart.


III.


And so I give, in token of that hour,
    This simple book of early song to thee,
Sung in far years that had a richer dower,
    And brought twelve Mays instead of one to me,
The gift is nothing—for to me it seems
    Mere spindrift from those mighty waves of song,
Heard in my youth, as sailors hear in dreams,
    The booming of the sullen ocean, strong
For conflict with the shore.   But thou and I
    Can only feel the link that lies in This,—
    The interchange of thought, the quiet bliss,
And all the silent rapture of the sky,
While at our feet, as earnest of that trust,
Which is of faith and love—the poet's dust.

_____________________

Alexander Anderson: Ballads and Sonnets (2).

CONTENTS.
―――♦―――

IN ROME, A POEM IN SONNETS
S
ONNET:— I.  II.  III.  IV.  V.  VI.  VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. XVI. XVII. XVIII. XIX. XX. XXI. XXII. XXIII. XXIV. XXV. XXVI. XXVII. XXVIII. XXIX. XXX. XXXI. XXXII. XXXIII. XXXIV. XXXV. XXXVI. XXXVII.

1.

AGNES DIED

27.

BLOOD ON THE WHEEL

39.

CHATEAUX EN ESPAGNE

45.

BLIND MATTHEW

52.

ADA

55.

JENNY WI' THE AIRN TEETH

59.

JAMIE'S WEE CHAIR

62.

A WALK TO PAMPHY LINNS

66.

CUDDLE DOON

81.

ALEXIS

84.

DAFT AILIE

96.

MAY MIDDLETON'S TAM

105.

JOHN KEATS

111.

THE ENGINE

115.

THE CUCKOO

121.

LOOK TO THE EAST

124.

THE DEIL'S STANE

128.

THE MOTHER AND THE ANGEL

138.

THE OPEN SECRET

140.

THE SPIRIT OF THE WATERS

144.

NOTTMAN

147.

SUMMER INVOCATION

151.

READING THE BOOK

156.

SONNETS TO A PICTURE

158.

SONNETS TO A PICTURE

161.

THE RED LEAF

164.

HE CAME FROM A LAND

167.

A PARTING

170.

WHERE I AM LYING NOW

172.

A MEMORY

174.

AGNES

177.

MARY

180.

THE WORSHIP OF SORROW

182.

EARLY POET LIFE

185.

THE LOST EDEN FOUND AGAIN

189.

OVER THE SEA, ANNIE

191.

SONNETS TO A FRIEND

193.

 



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