Later Poems (First Lines)
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A bird on the moorland is calling

162.

A brooding quiet rests to-day

99.

A day of fading light upon the sea;

52.

A dove went up, and struck the air

34.

A dream of youth has grown to fruit,

66.

A gladness pulses through the earth,

122.

A lark lap up in the daisied field,

274.

A little cottage just atop the brae,

163.

A pilgrim of the wilds to-day,

76.

A roofless Border keep that once

160.

A singer in the street to-day,

206.

A sound is in my ear to-day,

54.

A strappin', sonsie, weel-matched pair

224.

A sweet love-song, whose early touch—

41.

A voice from dreamland said to me—

1.

A voice is in the wind to-day,

51.

Ah, dear, we part for ever,

63.

Ah, what to me is Homer's song

154.

Alone. For Jack has gone away,

232.

An old worn copy of Dante,

257.

Ane sings the lassie that he lo'es,

198.

"Arm! for the foe is near," and as she spake

246.

As of old the river is singing,

123.

At God's right hand the angels stand

211.

At rest amid the flush of golden corn,

221.

Auld Johnnie Noddle sleeps through a' the day,

159.

Away from all the restless street,

277.

Bauld Robin Ford, frae Glasgow toon,

215.

Beside the manse the river flows

182.

Bonnie May Wyllie cam' cot o' the toon

204.

Come let us lift our voice, and sing

104.

Come in, gudeman, to your ain fireside,

35.

Death came to the earth, by his side was Spring,

8.

England, amid thy great in this great time

9.

Far down within my heart she stands

105.

Fareweel to my hame at the fit o' the glen,

158.

From hill-encircled Windermere,

250.

Grey tree within the churchyard old,

135.

He lays his heavy toil aside

268.

He sleeps among the hills he knew,

165.

He sleeps beneath the violets,

179.

He will not sing his loudest song,

183.

Here as I sit this summer day,

207.

Here in the city as I sit,

95.

Here's wee Tam aside the fire,

214.

Ho! stand bare-browed with me to-day, no
             common name we sing,

20.

Hoo cantie was I in my youth,

222.

How sweet was life langsyne, langsyne,

159.

I am auld an' frail, an' I scarce can gang,

193.

I am full of an aimless longing

41.

I dream this nicht, an' my thochts gae back

89.

I hear the lark to-day; he sings

260.

I hear the winds of summer rush

47.

I hear the voices of singers,

143.

I heard a voice—the voice of Fate—

176.

I heard beneath my feet the clear sharp ring

72.

I lay in the depths of dreamland,

145.

I lay where the winds were seeking

263.

I lie an' look doon on the clachan,

134.

I lift this old communion cup,

109.

I like to see in graceful row

107.

I never see a castle

174.

I push the little gate aside,

161.

I sat—in church, of course—and heard

132.

I sat in the house of the master,

102.

I saw the Arran hills shine through

270.

I sit afore a half-oot fire,

5.

I sit upon a shattered shaft, as if Time, worn and blind,

201.

I stand alone on the hillside,

142.

I stand and look down on the village,

241.

I stand with my shoulder to shoulders,

116.

I stood in the summer evening

90.

I stood upon the four-foot way

129.

I tried the gowfin' when at Troon,

149.

I walk the old familiar ways

112.

I walked for an hour in Selkirk,

275.

I was alone with the Master,

208.

I weary to-night, I weary,

220.

I will go into dark Gethsemane,

27.

I wish my little life had been

144.

If any song that I have sung

164.

If I were somewhat younger

106.

I'm growin' auld, an' no' sae yauld,

187.

In quiet, holy light she stands,

122.

In the chamber of death underground,

45.

Is there any room for the poet

240.

Isa in the garden stands

190.

It is naething but a lilt,

206.

Just a peep from a carriage window,

114.

Just at the corner of the street,

258.

Langsyne when life was bonnie,

98.

Last of the Scots his country knew so well,

148.

Last year I sat within my room,

184.

Let me lie upon the heather

15.

Life said to the soul of the poet—

180.

Like a great tree beside the stream of life

28.

Like mists that trail along the hill,

261.

Love, turn thy gentle feet away,

265.

Never through all the years to be

186.

No book to-night; but let me sit

57.

No sounds are heard from Yarrow Vale,

210.

O, bonnie Bessie Logan

115.

O, bonnie Toshie Norrie

105.

O, Cairn row saft where Maudie bides,

266.

O mavis singin' in the wood,

108.

O, mither, sing a sang to the bairns,

239.

O, there's nocht to tak' us back like the broom
            upon the brae,

170.

Oh for those days that had no doubt,

13.

Oh, Jenny, she is fair an' braw,

93.

One red rose you took from my hand—

60.

One star alone from the blue sky

53.

Over the meadow is singing

155.

Row, Kello, row frae rocky linns,

33.

Saft fa's the sun on Anwoth hills

141.

Sam Adamson, the driver, he

167.

Shadow and light are lying

262.

She sits upon her nest all day,

59.

She's an awfu' lassie, Jenny,

29.

So beautiful, so beautiful

268.

So thanks again; in after years

191.

Strong poet of the sleepless gods that dwell

26.

Sweet Jenny by the Solway sands,

208.

That nicht the dancin' schule was dune,

62.

The bairnies cuddle doon at nicht

2.

The dead man in the chamber dim

152.

The deid sleep soun' in the auld kirkyaird,

88.

The gods that dwell within the calm

157.

The great earth said to the poet,

118.

The great Lars Andersonicus,

218.

The great Napoleon! and these simple hairs

282.

The hills aroon' oor ain wee toon

267.

The hills in the Hielands are bonnie,

111.

The hills remain; they lift their brows

89.

The humble bee is hiding

125.

The little village sleeps to-day,

126.

The merry children are playing

12.

The poet looks on human things,

61.

The sea, as by some inner demon stung,

55.

The silent dead go marching down,

197.

The simmer day was sweet an' lang,

30.

The trees that shadow Alton Hall

238.

The wind, the summer wind of June,

256.

The winds have their sweetest whisper,

264.

The years have sped since first we met,

139.

This is a perfect day to lie

170.

This was what the pointsman said,

245.

Those simple daisies which you view,

85.

Thou city of my boyhood! Ere I dreamt

217.

Thou feathered happiness, come down to me,

270.

True man and poet, in whose verse is seen

189.

Twa miles frae here, or may be mair,

271.

Two master spirits of German song, they stand

29.

Two sisters stood by the window,

171.

Up went the finger, but that royal eye,

26.

Upon the rails I work away,

64.

Was it of wine and all its purple glow,

178.

Was that a knock?   Wha can it be?

6.

We are but shadows, and we pass

185.

We are the slaves of those that died

94.

We danced at night in the farm-house,

120.

We left the dear old house behind,

165.

We met upon the stepping stones,

32.

Well worth the climbing—what a glorious sight!

150.

What fretting loads we mortals bear

93.

What lark remembers when he sings,

151.

What of the dim old legends

177.

When first I saw the Tweed, the light

172.

When life is young, and dreams are sweet,

210.

Whisper, dear, that love is sweet,

156.

Who are the heroes we hail to-day,

69.

Why, hang it all, let life go by,

117.

"Within a mile o' Edinburgh toon,"

113.

Within an unseen cage he sings,

175.

Within the rough four-foot he lay,

272.

Wull I hae to speak again

3.

Yes, William Morris, it were well

242.

You ask me for a line or two—

192.

You smile, and half in jest you ask

279.

 



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