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SHEEN AND SHADE:


LYRICAL POEMS.


BY


WILLIAM BILLINGTON.

──────────


BLACKBURN:
JOHN NEVILLE HAWTHORTH, TOWN HALL BUILDINGS.


LONDON:
HALL & VIRTUE, PATERNOSTER ROW.

1861.

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ENTERED AT STATIONERS' HALL.
________________________________


BLACKBURN:
PRINTED BY JOHN NEVILLE HAWORTH, TOWN HALL BUILDINGS.




DEDICATION.
_______

TO THOMAS CLOUGH, ESQ., OF HOLLY BUSH, BLACKBURN.



DEAR SIR,

            By your generous aid at length I have succeeded in collecting the scattered offspring of my vagrant muse.  They are numerous, but not overgrown―a motley, but not immoral group.  Of manners rude and uncouth speech; they are mostly of the masculine gender, rugged in person and ragged in apparel, with a slight sprinkling of the fair few, with happy faces and holiday attire.  Varying much in age and intellect, in hopefulness and height, some are proud of their sense, others prefer sentimentalism; for one that would mount with mirth, there are, perhaps, ten that would mope with melancholy; hence life with them is less frequently ringing out in laughter than running to waste in tears.  They are humble, but honest, and with them all, as with their dam, a wise head and a warm heart will outweigh the wealth of worlds.  Although one or two of the merrier, albeit more mischievous, bantlings are absent, the family circle will, doubtless, be found to be somewhat complete.  However, such as they are, I commend them to your paternal care and kindness, and send them forth into the world to find their way, if haply they may, to the homes and hearts of the patient but persistent, the humble but hopeful, the suffering but still aspiring sons of toil, who, metaphor apart, have thought the thoughts, felt the feelings, and lived the life pourtrayed in this little volume,―the fruits of the leisure hours of a self-taught working man,―which (in appreciation of the many public boons you have been instrumental in conferring upon the labouring population of Blackburn, amongst which I would particularize our FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY) is humbly inscribed to you as a small token of esteem and gratitude by

THE AUTHOR.

 

CONTENTS

 

PAGE

The Trinity of Life

1.

An Hour with Nature and with Night

7.

The World of Dreams

9.

Poesy

15.

The Voice of Spring

18.

A Woodland Walk

21.

May Day Morn

23.

Thou art Coming, Fruitful Summer

25.

Recollections of Childhood

28.

Beauty

31.

Where Doth Beauty Dwell?

32.

A Dirge

34.

Wilt Thou not Weep for Me?

37.

Would I were No More!

39.

Apostrophe to Hope

41.

The Angel's Tomb

43.

The Coffin and the Shroud

45.

A Life-Lyric

47.

The Faded Flower

49.

Loved and Lost

50.

Not Here but Hereafter

51.

The Autumn-Spirit

53.

Stanzas on the opening of the Blackburn Corporation Park

61.

A voice from the Old Church Tower

63.

Elegy on Past Grand John Kenyon

64.

To Mary

65.

The Poet's Mission

67.

Love's Labour Lost

71.

A Winter Morning's Walk

73.

Christmas

74.

Farewell to the Old Year, 1855

76.

Time

77.

POEMS FOR THE PEOPLE.

A Voice from the Country

79.

The Lost Jewel

80.

The Cottage of Discontent

82.

Never Despair

85.

Pause not on the Path of Duty

86.

Press Forward and Prevail

89.

There's Danger in Delay

91.

Better Late than Never

94.

All will be Well in the End

95.

This Bad World is Better than Good Men allow

96.

Mate Me with Children or Leave Me Alone!

98.

The Task of To-Day

100.

The Golden God

103.

They Crush because We Cringe

106.

Let us Help each other Onward

108.

Let us Labour One and All

110.

Let us Hope for Better Days

114.

The Spirit of the Age

116.

The Uncrowned Conqueror

118.

The Sunny Side of Life

121.

When will the Good Time Come?

124.

What have We to Fear?

126.

The Death of the Old Year, 1856

128.

Britons, be Brothers

130.

SONNETS.

Poetry and the Present Age

133.

Chaucer

134.

Spencer

134.

Shakspeare

135.

Milton

136.

Pope

136.

Thomson

137.

Burns

138.

Byron

138.

Keats

139.

Edgar Allen Poe

140.

Alexander Smith

140.

Gerald Massey

141.

Love

142.

Bliss beyond the Grave

142.

The Rising Sun

143.

Coniston Water and the Old Man

144.

The People's Park

144.

The Malthusian Philosophy

145.

Salford Bridge

146.

ACROSTICS.

To a Young Poet

147.

Friendship

148.

The Sweets of Love

148.

 Singular but So

149.

One Smile of Thine

150.

Time will Tell

150.

A Blessing

151.

The Mother to Her Child

152.

EPISTLES.

The Infirmary

153.

To a Poet-Friend

155.

People's Colleges

156.

Leisure Moments

158.

 



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