Derby Co-op Jubilee
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PREFACE.


THERE is no more picturesque and encouraging history of co-operative self-help anywhere than that of the Derby Society—the third which has attained the distinction of a Jubilee.  Rochdale had the distinction of being its precursor and of initiating new principles of progress, before unknown or unapplied, but Derby has excelled it in surmounting greater difficulties.  Rochdale had twenty-eight pioneers.  The Derby Society was founded by twelve.  Rochdale had £28 of capital, Derby had only £2.  Derby had no experienced advisers at the beginning, as Leeds had, to counsel it, assist it, and defend it.  Derby shares profits with employees, in which respect it stands higher than Rochdale or Leeds.

    The Derby Society was founded by workmen uninformed and unfriended.  It was not until after ten years of patience, courage, obscurity, and persistence, that they were reinforced by men of their own order, of more knowledge and resource, who carried the society forward to the success recounted in the following pages.

    Mr. A. Scotton and I have written this History—without him it could not possess its coherence, nor incidents of narrative which it is hoped may beguile the reader to peruse the story.

    For forty years he has served the Derby Society in every capacity, official and representative.  He has been its Boswell, and was for sixteen years the editor of its Monthly Record, which is still published.  He is known throughout the movement as an able and genial leader, steadfast to its original principles.  Important facts have been contributed by him, and many passages in what follows will be recognised as his, though it is fitting that another hand should record his part in building up the Derby Co-operative Provident Society.  Many others hereinafter named have contributed in no mean degree to the same end.

    Our aim in this book has been to record what may be informing to the public, and create respect for the co-operative cause—what may be instructive to members, increase their pride in the movement to which they belong, and incite them and enable them to advance, yet more efficiently, their own interests.

G. J. H.

 

ILLUSTRATIONS.
______

Frontispiece—Central Premises, Albert Street and Exchange Street.

 

PAGE

The Old Silk Mill, Derby

11.

Derby, from Exeter Bridge

15.

The First Store, George Yard

21.

Portrait—T. R. Brown

25.

Portrait—J. Swift, late Secretary

41.

Portrait—A. Scotton

45.

Branches—Park Street, Nun Street, Bridge Gate, and Abbey Street

51.

Portrait—R. Hilliard, J.P., Manager

73.

Branches-Rose Hill, Cotton Lane, Littleover, and Mickleover

77.

Branches —Duflield, Parliament Street, Alvaston, and Peel Street

85.

Branches—Dale Road, Shaftesbury Street, Leaman Street, and
            Burton Road

89.

Branches—Wilmorton, Princes Street, Walter Street, and
            Osmaston Road

93.

Bakery, Monk Street, No. 2 Bakery and No. 3 Bakery, Monk Street,
            and King Alfred Street Butchery

99.

No. 1 Dairy, Spondon; Rose Hill Drapery, Boots, and Butchery; Building
            Yard, Werburgh Street; Interior of No. 2 Dairy, Spondon

105.

Stables, Monk Street

109.

Coal Depôt, Nottingham Road

109.

Central Hardware, East Street

109.

Branches—Old Normanton, Little Eaton, Bakewell Street, and
            Dairy House Road

115.

Portrait—G. Woodhouse, President

123.

Portrait—J. B. Rest, Secretary

129.

Portrait—W. F. Townson, Treasurer

137.

Branches—Violet Street, Spondon, Chester Green, and
            Brough Street

143.

Portrait—B. Webster

149.

Branches—Parliament Street, Peel Street, Norfolk Street, and
            London Road

151.

Portraits—Management Committee

157.

Portraits—Educational Committee

163.

Portraits—Auditors

169.

Portraits—Tailoring and Butchery Committee

173.

Portraits—Boot and Coal Committee

179.

Portraits—Drapery Committee

185.

Portraits—Building Committee

191.

Evening on the Derwent

195.

________________________

 

CONTENTS.
______

 

CHAP.

Town of Derby

I.

The Co-operative Store

II.

The Beginning in George Yard

III.

Transference to Victoria Street

IV.

Singular Career in Full Street

V.

The Park Street Store

VI.

The Nun Street Branch

VII.

Curiosities of Early Records

VIII.

Central Stores

IX.

Origin and Growth of Branches

X.

The Departments

XI.

Monthly Manifesto

XII.

Derby Congress

XIII.

Some Makers of the Society

XIV.

The Midland Railway Institute

XV.

A Libeller Brought to Book

XVI.

Officers and Committee of Management

XVII.

Distinction between Store-keeping and Shop-
    keeping

XVIII.

The New Trade and the Old Trade

XIX.

Characteristics of the Derby Society

XX.

 


 

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