Poetic Rosary
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THE

POETIC ROSARY.

BY

JOHN CRITCHLEY PRINCE,

AUTHOR OF "HOURS WITH THE MUSES,"
&c. &c. &c.


 

"Some waifs and strays from that bright sod
"Which I have seen, but have not trod,
"The Golden Land of Poesy."




PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR, AND SOLD BY HIM,
PENNY MEADOW, ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE.

_________________

LONDON:
SIMPKIN AND MARSHALL.
MANCHESTER: GEO. HATTON, 39, VICTORIA STREET.
1850.

__________________________________________

CAVE AND SEVER, PRINTERS, I8, ST. ANN'S-STREET, MANCHESTER.
__________________________________________



TO

CHARLES DICKENS, ESQUIRE,

THESE

Poetic Effusions

ARE, BY HIS KIND PERMISSION, MOST RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED,
AS A
SINCERE TESTIMONY OF THE HIGH ESTEEM IN WHICH
HIS HUMANIZING WRITINGS, WITH THEIR WIDE AND GENEROUS
SYMPATHIES, ARE HELD BY HIS OBEDIENT SERVANT,


The Author.

_________________

ADVERTISEMENT.


ENCOURAGED by the favour with which his former efforts have all been received, the Author ventures to lay before the Public another little Volume.

    The following Poems have been written at various times and seasonsin various moods, and under various influences.  And whether they be deemed to possess any other merit or not, the Author at least hopes that his kind Friends and Readers will not perceive any diminution of that moral aim and tendency by which he has ever been anxious that his literary efforts should be characterised, whatever be the Poetic merit which the Public may please to ascribe to them.

    In the Poem entitled "The Town of Tears," it is possible that the Author may have committed some anachronisms.  If so, he is not aware of them.  Ignorance is a poor plea for an Author; but it is hoped that it may be accepted in this instance.  The Poem is founded on a paragraph, accidentally seen, from Cheever's "Pilgrim of Jungfrau."  The Author has not had an opportunity of referring to the work itself.

ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE,
                         SEPTEMBER, 1850.

_________________

 

Contents.

 

PAGE

WELCOME TO SPRING

1.

A SONG FOR MARCH

5.

"THE WEARY OLD YEAR IS NO MORE"

7.

THE HOUSEHOLD JEWELS

10.

THE ROSE OF CAYPHA

15.

BUCKTON CASTLE

17.

KOSSUTH'S PRAYER

22.

FORGIVENESS

25.

THE DESERT AND THE CITY

28.

THE STREAM AND THE VINE

32.

THE THREE ANGELS

35.

THE WINTER'S WALK:

 

Influence of Nature

39.

The Solitude

41.

The Robin

42.

The Old Mill

43.

The Village

44.

Sunset

46.

DEATH'S DOINGS

48.

THE ROBINA Poem for Childhood

53.

EXTEMPORE LINESTo a Young Poet

57.

A WISH

59.

JUNEA Sonnet

62.

SPRINGA Sonnet

63.

"MY FATHER'S FARM"

64.

ON THE DEATH OF EBENEZER ELLIOTT

68.

AN ARTIZAN'S SONG

71.

SPRING

75.

THE SHEPERD'S DOG

77.

THE WORKMAN'S EVENING SONG

81.

"AS WELCOME AS FLOWERS IN MAY"

84.

CHRISTMAS

88.

A LOVE MELODY

91.

THE GOLDEN LAND OF POESY

93.

THE RESCUE

96.

THE FAIRY'S FUNERALA Fantasy

101.

A SONG OF THE WOODLANDS

108.

A MAY-DAY WALK

110.

THE SILVER CHAMBERA Dream

122.

PLEURS; or, THE TOWN OF TEARS

125.

ZOANA

146.

_________________

PHILIP MORLEYA Tale

171.

PAULINE PERONNEA Reminiscence

185.

CHANGES FOR THE BETTER(From an unpublished Lecture)

200.

_________________

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

 



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